Stories of Leadership: CC Donors

The Climate Collaborative is a free community to join, with resources, and tools to help any company go deeper on climate. This is all made possible by the contributions of our donors, and their commitment to helping the whole industry move forward. As a thank you to them, we want to share some of the fantastic ways our sponsors are leading the way on responding to climate change--and bringing the industry along with them through their support and the examples they set.

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Satellite Symphony: How Satellites, Compost, and Cows Made the Business Case for Regenerative Farming

You can download a version of this case study here.

The Power of Carbon Farming to Mitigate Climate Change

Agriculture accounts for 15% of global emissions, and carbon farming practices such as composting, cover cropping, and rotational grazing have significant potential to start reversing that number. Project Drawdown has shown that carbon farming or regenerative agriculture practices are the 11th most powerful tool in humanity’s tool kit to mitigate global warming.

As of this writing, 151 companies have committed to implement these practices through the Climate Collaborative. Many of those companies are struggling with how to engage farmers in their supply chains to begin a shift toward adopting carbon building practices. This is, in part, because while the climate case is clear, the business case is still being developed.

Straus Family Creamery— a pioneer in carbon farming and many other sustainable practices— set out to change that. Straus has started to build an unprecedented financial case for carbon farming and ranchland management.

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Case Study: Reducing Food Waste Through Supplier Engagement

You can download a version of this case study here.

The Climate Potential of Food Waste Reduction

pom.jpgA third of all food produced globally goes to waste, accounting for 4.4 gigatonnes of GHG emissions. If food waste were its own country, it would rank third-highest in emissions of all the countries on Earth![1]

Food waste emissions are created through the process of growing, harvesting, processing, packaging, transporting, and refrigerating food, then transporting it again to its final resting place—the landfill—where it rots, creating more GHG emissions. Food waste also represents a tremendous waste of resources including water, cropland, fuel, fertilizer and human labor, making it not only terrible for the environment but also a significant financial loss for brands, retailers and consumers!

Situated between producers, distributors and consumers, retailers have a unique potential to impact emissions both upstream and down, by working with all of these parties to minimize food loss and waste. BriarPatch Food Co-op, a community-owned business in Grass Valley, California, has pioneered a successful effort to minimize waste at the source by working with local producers.

 

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Conversion to 50% Post Consumer Recycled PET Bottles

You can download a version of this case study here.

REBBL_Bottles.JPG

CC_Not_For_Sale.JPGREBBL, an organic beverage company that creates plant-based elixirs, makes strides in reducing its environmental footprint by incorporating recycled plastic into its bottles. A core part of REBBLʼs mission is to create positive social and environmental impact by leveraging business as a tool for good. Through ethical, impact sourcing of ingredients, REBBL strives for dignified supply chains, promotes regenerative stewardship of the earth and its resources, and empowers communities around the world, thereby reducing the risk of human trafficking. REBBL also contributes 2.5% of net sales to the nonprofit Not for Sale, an organization that supports survivors of exploitation.

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Happy Family Organics Right-Sizes Packages Reducing Climate Impact

You can download a version of this case study here.

Happy Family Organics started as Happy Baby in 2006 with the mission to “change the trajectory of children’s health through happy_family_yogis.JPGnutrition.” Since then, the company has grown exponentially and continues to offer innovatively packaged organic food options grown without artificial hormones, GMOs, or toxic persistent pesticides.


Alongside the company’s growth, they’ve deepened their commitment to climate action. They’ve made six climate commitments through the Climate Collaborative, and packaging is one of their core priority areas.

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Impacts of Increased Recycled Content in Secondary Packaging

You can download a version of this case study here.

Guayakí’s vision holds that yerba mate culture will power their Market Driven Regeneration™ business model to regenerate ecosystems and create vibrant communities. Yerba mate is a holly plant native to South America with the caffeine strength of guayaki_can.JPGcoffee, the health benefits of tea, and the euphoria of chocolate.


Guayakí sells a wide range of products from loose leaf yerba mate and mate bags, mate gourds and bombillas (drinking apparatus) to ready-to-drink beverages made from yerba mate in a wide variety of flavors.


Guayakí focuses on the whole product life cycle and incorporates regeneration in each step, including their packaging. 95% of their packaging is recyclable or compostable including a home-compostable bag.

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Engaging in Climate Policy Through Collaborative Organizing

You can download a version of this case study here.

ENGAGING IN POLICY TO MITIGATE CLIMATE CHANGE

Although corporate action is critical, it is not sufficient to overcome our climate challenges. The global nature of climate change – a true “tragedy of the commons” – makes it too easy for the efforts of climate-forward corporations to be rendered moot by the actions of others that fail to act in a similarly climate-friendly manner. Only with government policies and enforcement can we hope to enact the kinds of sweeping changes needed to level the playing field for businesses and truly move the needle on climate change.

Climate Collaborative committed company Mountain Rose Herbs began collaborating with other companies and nonprofits to increase their impact on climate-friendly policies in their home state of Oregon. Their efforts serve as an excellent example for other companies considering taking the plunge into policy engagement.

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2018 Tracking Progress Update

You can view and download a PDF version of the update here.

The Climate Collaborative’s (CC) Tracking Progress Update is a short annual survey for committed companies to provide information on how they are progressing against their climate commitments. 2018 is the first tracking progress cycle for the CC; we asked all companies that made commitments before December 31, 2017 to respond.

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Partner Case Study: WHOLE FOODS MARKET - MAKING THE CASE FOR RAPID SOLAR ROLL-OUT

This case study was originally posted by the by the Department of Energy's Better Buildings Initiative, in partnership with IMT. You can view the original post and the link to the full case study, here

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The Key to Climate Impact? Leverage the Supply Chain, Says Glen’s Garden Market

Glens’ Garden Market has climate action in its DNA. Founder Danielle Vogel created the Washington, D.C.-based store after leaving a career working on climate change legislation in the U.S. Senate. “Glen’s exists to make climate change progress – one bite at a time – by serving Good Food from close by, and growing relationships with partners, who treat their land, their animals and their ingredients with respect,” says Vogel.

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